The Coliseum, Rome

With the population strength of 2.7 million, Rome has mild to rainy climate in winter while in the summer it is hot and dry. To understand the city’s artistic richness it would be wise to move on foot since you can play it by ear while you can take quick side trips at the inspiration of the poetic spirit in you. However to move around conveniently you can depend on private guided tours for which you can easily contact your hotel management. Tram-Bus system is another reasonably priced option that will take you around the city and Rome’s neighborhoods as well to enjoy a charming tour.

Whatever may be your special preferences as a tourist there are some places you cannot miss when you are visiting Rome with the sole purpose of sightseeing. In the popularity scale possibly the Coliseum would come next to the Vatican to say the least. Moreover it is the most recognizable structure of Rome. Since operating hours vary all along the year it would be advisable that for admission details you call beforehand.

Once you finish the gravity-filled visit of The Coliseum, stroll along the lane to Foro Romano, also known as Roman Forum, which was Ancient Rome’s community center. Economic, political and religious activities took place at that very site. In the midst of the ruins a number of its columns still stand high even after 2000 years, vouching for the great qualities of Roman architecture valued even today. From 9 am to an hour before sunset it remains open for visitors while free admission it offers.

The Pantheon stands today without hardly any changes and that makes it difficult to believe that it is 1,800 years old really. Around 125 AD, Emperor Hadrian built The Pantheon or “temple to all gods”. The 9-meter opening of its concrete dome is the only source of illumination inside. Here remain buried two kings of Italy and many other prominent individuals of Europe. Every day in week including holidays except Christmas it remains open. No admission fee is charged.

Three hours you can spend easily for visiting The Vatican and the collection there, of paintings, sculptures, books and a number of artifacts that record the Catholic Church’s history in chronological order. Also relish in St. Peter’s Basilica, the wonder of Michelangelo’s Pieta, note its detailed masonry, and the papal catacombs as well. Proceed next to the Vatican Museum that houses some more thrilling antiquities of which no less important are Egyptian mummies dating back to the BC period.

In case there is time constraint move to the Sistine Chapel skipping all other attractions. It is stated that when Pope Julius II invited Michelangelo, a rare sculptor basically, to paint the Bible on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, he guessed it could be a ploy of his rivals who might have thought that since Michelangelo was not known for his skill as a painter he would create something very ordinary and thus would land in an embarrassing situation. However events did not follow exactly that track as we learn from the history. Truly speaking, the Sistine Chapel is considered perhaps as the Renaissance period’s most valued gift.

Since you will get many restaurants and cafes in near vicinity of main tourist attractions and that makes it easy to take care whenever you are hungry. For specials and tourist information the hotel concierge is generally the best source and that is the case here too.

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